The Paris Agreement, signed in 2015, is a global treaty aimed at tackling climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. While the agreement sets ambitious goals to limit the increase in global temperatures, a crucial question remains: how is the Paris Agreement enforced?

Enforcement mechanisms in the Paris Agreement

Unlike other international agreements, the Paris Agreement does not have a specific enforcement mechanism. Instead, the agreement relies on a system of transparency and mutual accountability to ensure that signatory countries meet their commitments.

Each country submits an individually determined contribution (INDC) to the agreement, outlining their specific plans for reducing emissions. These plans are then reviewed and evaluated by a technical expert review process, which provides feedback and recommendations for improvement.

Additionally, countries are required to submit regular progress reports, which are subject to review and assessment by a team of independent experts. This review process aims to ensure transparency and accountability among signatories.

Moreover, the Paris Agreement established a mechanism to facilitate compliance with the agreement, known as the Compliance Committee. This committee is tasked with considering and addressing cases of non-compliance with the Paris Agreement, including disputes between parties that cannot be resolved through other means.

Despite lacking a specific enforcement mechanism, the Paris Agreement has incentivized countries to take significant steps towards reducing their emissions. As of 2021, over 190 countries have ratified the agreement, and many are making progress towards achieving their INDCs.

Challenges to enforcement

Despite the progress made towards compliance, there are still challenges to enforcing the Paris Agreement. One of the significant challenges is the lack of punitive measures for non-compliance, which means that non-compliance is more of a reputational issue rather than a legal one. Moreover, some countries may not have the resources or the political will to meet their commitments.

Another challenge is the lack of clear guidelines for implementing the Paris Agreement, particularly in areas such as emissions accounting and transparency. This can lead to ambiguity and inconsistencies in reporting, making it difficult to assess whether countries are meeting their commitments.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the Paris Agreement relies on a system of transparency and mutual accountability to ensure that signatory countries meet their commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. While the agreement does not have a specific enforcement mechanism, there are still incentives for compliance, including peer pressure, reputational benefits, and access to funding and technology. However, challenges remain, including the lack of punitive measures for non-compliance and the need for clearer guidelines for implementation.